There’s lots of material you need to know to be an engineer. We teach you the fundamental principles you need to continue in the profession, but to get a sense of how to use it you need to explore on your own.

EXAMPLE: CIVIL ENGINEERING STUDENTS TACKLE COASTAL EROSION

After four weeks learning about civil engineering principles, students were put into small groups and given background information on a village facing problems with costal erosion. Then they spent a week looking for solutions, which they then presented to the rest of the students. Lecturers were available to provide assistance, but students were encouraged to find their own way and come up with their own ideas.

Hear students talk about their scenario experiences in the video below:

EXAMPLE: ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING STUDENTS DECODING REAL SIGNALS

Being able to diagnose a problem is a crucial skill for engineers. Electronic engineers were faced with a phone line and asked to determine what number was being dialled. Using their understanding of electromagnetism, they detected the signal flowing through the wire, and drawing on their skills in signal analysis and digital processing determined what it was saying. The number was for a mobile phone sealed in a box in the middle of the classroom: the first group to find the number and call the phone were declared the winners.

EXAMPLE: CONTROLLING CUSTOM ROBOTS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer science students learn programming and problem-solving through controlling custom robots, developed and made entirely by UCL Computer Science staff. Students learn to control their robots’ movement, take input from its sensors, and then complete a number of other challenges, finishing up with the UCL Computer Science robot race.

Why we do it

University is a time for people to develop their independence as well as their skills. To help you connect the theory there are opportunities in all years to put it into practice. Our programmes are designed to not only provide core technical skills but also help you understand the bigger picture. Engineering problems don’t respect disciplinary boundaries, so we aim to produce graduates that understand the context of what they do and how to work in interdisciplinary teams to produce results. When you learn in this way you understand teamwork, compromise, communication and how to think around a problem.

Many reports from industry and professional bodies have identified a need for engineering graduates to be more familiar with not just course content, but applying it in unfamiliar situations. In this way, we help prepare our students for life after graduation.

Also, our students enjoy it.