Scenarios

 

Outside education, many people work in teams with specialists in different disciplines to address big problems without a known answer. Traditional courses don’t address this until the later years of the degree – if they include it at all. We think that, to be successful in this environment, you need to start doing challenging work with others as soon as possible.

Our newly-developed module, known as Integrated Engineering, gives first-year students an opportunity to put their learning into practice through interdisciplinary, problem-based learning with a design focus: specifically to work on two major five-week design projects.

You’ll be set to work on real problems – such as securing a country’s energy supply or distributing life’s necessities to communities in the developing world – and asked to work in a group to develop one piece of a proposed solution. You’ll use both the professional skills and technical knowledge you’ve gained in class to achieve this, and present your work to your peers, instructors and industry advisors.

UCL Engineering was a pioneer in this method of teaching, and many of our departments have their own take on it.


CIVIL ENGINEERING STUDENTS TACKLE COASTAL EROSION

After four weeks learning about civil engineering principles, students were put into small groups and given background information on a village facing problems with coastal erosion. Then they spent a week looking for solutions, which they then presented to the rest of the students. Lecturers were available to provide assistance, but students were encouraged to find their own way and come up with their own ideas.

Hear students talk about their scenario experiences in the video below:


ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING STUDENTS DECODING REAL SIGNALS

Being able to diagnose a problem is a crucial skill for engineers. Electronic engineers were faced with a phone line and asked to determine what number was being dialled. Using their understanding of electromagnetism, they detected the signal flowing through the wire, and drawing on their skills in signal analysis and digital processing determined what it was saying. The number was for a mobile phone sealed in a box in the middle of the classroom: the first group to find the number and call the phone were declared the winners.


CONTROLLING CUSTOM ROBOTS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer science students learn programming and problem-solving through controlling custom robots, developed and made entirely by UCL Computer Science staff. Students learn to control their robots’ movement, take input from its sensors, and then complete a number of other challenges, finishing up with the UCL Computer Science robot race.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING – THE IMECHE DESIGN CHALLENGE

Mechanical engineering students enter the IMechE Design challenge, a competition for first year students to design, build and test an electrically-powered device to lift an increasing load vertically up a copper pipe.

The IMechE Design Challenge 2015 – http://www.imeche.org/news/institution/students-rise-to-the-design-challenge-in-2015

http://www.imeche.org/knowledge/industries/manufacturing/design-challenge-competition


FURTHER DETAILS OF THE PROGRAMME

 


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17 Sep 2015

Dan Mannion, a 2nd year Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Nanotechnology at the Faculty of Engineering Sciences at UCL, blogs for Tomorrow’s Engineers about engineering life and misconceptions in engineering....

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