How to Change the World

Technology has a role to play in solving society’s challenges, but to crack them students need to apply their skills meaningfully. How to Change the World helps students understand social and cultural context, and the different ways business and governments are motivated to engage with change.

500 students from humanities, engineering and sciences come together for two weeks at the end of the third term in June. Experts from UCL STEaPP and beyond share their approaches to changing the world, sustainably, equitably, collaboratively, and through business, policy and social entrepreneurship.

Through this challenge-based, problem-solving workshop, students and project partners from organisations such as the Red Cross/Red Crescent, Department of Transport, Department of Energy and Climate Change, and the World Bank gain the chance to examine real-world challenges in a creative way.

How to Change the World will provide science, engineering and humanities students with a unique opportunity to think critically about the challenges and opportunities facing our world today.

Challenge: Forecast based disaster preparedness, set by the Red Cross

The team addressed the problem of flooding in a Zambian village by focusing on the biggest cause of death following disasters: loss of crops leading to starvation. To protect the crops, they suggested short, medium and long term solutions, including building levees, reforestation with local mopane trees or the construction of a dam, respectively.

Work with us

Suggest a challenge: We look for broad global challenges and local expertise to help students put their solutions into context.

Contact:

Dr John Mitchell
Director, UCL Integrated Engineering Programme


To Change The World, Teach DifferentlyMinorsIntegrated EngineeringHow to Change the WorldScenariosDesign and Professional SkillsLeadership Insights Self Awareness and Team SkillsEngineering InspirationHelp Train Tomorrow’s Engineers


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